Breonna Taylor’s Mother: ‘I Won’t Go Away. I’ll Still Fight’

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Tamika Palmer, mother of Breonna Taylor, addressed the media in Louisville, Ky., last month. She says she wants the officers involved in the deadly raid to be charged.

Dylan Lovan/AP


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Dylan Lovan/AP


Live Updates: Protests For Racial Justice
Louisville Agrees To $12 Million Settlement With Breonna Taylor’s Family

In the six months since her death, Taylor’s name has been chanted countless times at demonstrations in Louisville and across the nation as activists call for greater police accountability and an end to police brutality against communities of color.

Taylor is among a steadily growing list of Black Americans who were killed or seriously injured by law enforcement this year and have now have become household names, including George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks and Jacob Blake.

Demonstrators hold their cases up as examples of police using excessive force during encounters with communities of color. In many cases, including Taylor’s, critics say justice for the victims’ family has so far been elusive.


Live Updates: Protests For Racial Justice
Breonna Taylor’s Mother Urges Criminal Charges: ‘Every Day Is Still March The 13th’

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron’s office is weighing whether to charge the three Louisville police officers involved in Taylor’s shooting death.

Lonita Baker, a Taylor family attorney, said the multi-million-dollar settlement with the city should not take the pressure off of Cameron’s office.

«It is important for people to understand that the settlement of the civil case involving the officers is completely different from that of the criminal case,» Baker said.

«So settling the civil suit has absolutely nothing to do with the criminal case.»

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Tamika Palmer spoke at the March on Washington last month at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. At left is Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, and at right is Rev. Al Sharpton.

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP


Live Updates: Protests For Racial Justice
Louisville Selects Black Woman As City’s Interim Police Chief

The Louisville Metro Police Department now plans to hire social workers for officer support. The settlement also includes creating a housing credit program that will incentivize officers to live in neighborhoods they police.

Earlier this month, Fischer named Yvette Gentry as the department’s new interim police chief. When she assumes the role on Oct. 1, she’ll be the first Black woman to lead the department. She will also be the troubled department’s third chief since the March killing of Taylor.

Gentry had retired from the police department in 2014 but agreed to come back until a permanent police chief is hired. Officials hope to name a permanent chief by year’s end.

  • national protests
  • Louisville Police
  • Breonna Taylor
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