They Voted For Trump And Then For Biden. Here’s What These Swing Voters Think Now



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President Biden is seen here campaigning for California Gov. Gavin Newsom earlier this month.

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Then she added that there’s just an overall unease that’s troubling. «It’s just kind of, like, not really trusting what to expect,» she said.

As for Biden, she said, «I just put him at, like, the average. He hasn’t done anything great. And outside of Afghanistan, nothing awful.» But she was clearly hoping for better.

Not thrilled with Biden, but absolutely not missing Trump

These two focus groups consisted of all Biden voters, but overwhelmingly they still consider themselves Republicans. They haven’t yet left the party, even though they’re disillusioned by Trump’s ongoing presence and the control he still holds.

In contrast to the majority of Republicans responding to polls, none of these voters falsely believes the 2020 election was stolen.

None said they regret their 2020 vote. And while they may be disappointed in Biden, they absolutely rule out voting for Trump if he runs for president again.

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Former President Donald Trump waves to the crowd at the end of a rally on Saturday in Perry, Ga.

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Former President Donald Trump waves to the crowd at the end of a rally on Saturday in Perry, Ga.

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Take Christine from the Philadelphia suburbs. Like others in her focus group, she said she first voted for Trump because he was a businessman and not a politician.

But she got far more than she bargained for. She used blunt language to describe the former president: «I felt like we had this monster in office that was bipolar, up and down, irrational, crazy thinking.» She called Trump «childish,» said that «crazy things came out of his mouth,» and that he was «not good for the United States.»

And after all of that, Christine confessed: «I didn’t want to vote for Biden. And I’m going to be honest with you, I would have voted for anybody but Trump.»

Others in the group blamed Trump for inciting racial tensions, citing how he described participants in a white supremacist march in Charlottesville, Va., as «very fine people.»

As for Trump’s oft-stated claim that he would «drain the swamp» in Washington, D.C., focus group member Mike, who lives in Georgia, had this retort: «I think he made the swamp bigger.»

«It’s like, where do we go?»

These swing voters readily say that their frustrations with both a Republican Party in Trump’s grasp and with Biden leave them feeling a bit lost politically.

Georgia resident Xaveria asked a simple question: «It’s like, where do we go?»

These voter discussions were part of a series of focus groups that have been organized by longtime political strategist Sarah Longwell, who herself is a Republican who has worked to defeat Trump.

She hears voters like Xaveria and Christine and says they reject Trump and GOP candidates trying to be «Trumpy» themselves. She says such voters are open to voting for Democrats, but the party also needs to nominate more moderate candidates to make these voters feel welcome there.

These moderate-to-conservative voters are «are very clear that they feel politically unmoored, politically homeless,» Longwell said in an interview.

«I really view these voters as up for grabs in 2022 and 2024,» she said. But Longwell says it matters who the candidates are, and how the parties see themselves.

And Longwell says it makes such voters worth watching. It also makes them potentially pivotal. «Right now, people who are willing to change their vote from one party to another really hold the keys to political power,» she said.



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